eye

There are a lot of changes taking place in the world of ocular surgery. Now, numerous eye surgeons are taking advantage of ocular advances, such as Prokera cryopreserved amniotic membrane. This is something that can be used in the treatment of a wide variety of conditions, including the treatment of keratitis. As a result, PROKERA for Patients has become popular among countless ocular surgeons. Now, one of the biggest advancements has been the development of ocular surface optimization. As the name suggests, the goal of this type of optimization is to improve patient outcomes when they go in for ocular surgery. With patients living longer than ever, laser eye surgery and cataract surgery are becoming more common. If you want to maximize patient outcomes, you need to take advantage of ocular surface optimization. What is this, and why is it so important to ocular surgery? 

What Is Ocular Surface Optimization?

Ocular surface optimization is the process of making sure that the eye is ready for whatever surgical procedure is coming, such as cataract surgery. The ocular surface is the first reflecting surface of the eye. As a result, the ocular surface is important for performing correct IOL power calculations and making sure all biometric measurements are accurate. Essentially, optimizing the integrity of the ocular surface before going in for cataract surgery can help improve patient outcomes.

If you want your patients to be satisfied with the outcome of cardiac surgery, you need to optimize the ocular surface beforehand. If you optimize the ocular surface, patients will have an easier time seeing clearly after the procedure. 

What Types of Issues Can Ocular Surface Optimization Address?

If you are scheduling a patient for cataract surgery, you probably do your pre-surgery exam to make sure the eyes are ready. You might interview the patient and ask them about symptoms of other ocular conditions. Even if the patient is not reporting any other problems, there could still be other issues with the eyes you need to address. You need to take care of these issues before the procedure begins because they are important for making sure your patients have a positive outcome.

For example, some patients are suffering from dry eye disease. This can dramatically impact the visual quality of patients who undergo ocular surgery. There might even be issues related to the ocular surface itself. If a patient is suffering from ocular surface disease, this can make the procedure much more difficult. Patients may not be as happy with the results of the ocular surgery.

It is also possible that patients undergoing cataract surgery may have central corneal staining. If that is the case, it might make it harder for patients to see clearly after the operation. Furthermore, some patients may have an abnormal tear osmolarity. If the ions in the patient’s tear fluid is not at the right concentration, it can impact the results of the procedure. You need to make sure that doesn’t happen. One of the ways to do that is to optimize the ocular surface prior to the procedure.

What Happens if You Do Not Optimize the Ocular Surface Before the Procedure?

If you do not optimize the ocular surface prior to the ocular procedure, you might run into a variety of issues. Some of the most common problems you may experience include:

  • There might be issues related to the IOL calculation. If the procedures are not right, you may implant the wrong type of lens. This can have an adverse impact on the ability of the patient to see after the procedure.
  • You might also experience unsatisfactory post-surgical outcomes. For example, the patient may develop new symptoms during the immediate postoperative period. The patient may not be happy with the surgical procedure.
  • There might be issues related to visual quality and visual acuity. Ocular surface disease can get worse following eye surgery if you do not optimize the ocular surface prior to the procedure.
  • Furthermore, if there are tear film irregularities, the retinal image quality can get worse. This means that the patient might actually experience retinal issues after cataract surgery is done.

All of this can have an adverse impact on the outcome of your cataract surgery procedures. If you would like to avoid them, you need to invest in ocular surface optimization before the procedure. You should take a close look at the ocular surface to see if there is anything you need to do to optimize it. Fortunately, there are advanced tools you can use to improve your surgical outcomes. 

What Are the Signs of Ocular Surface Disease?

Of course, you need to be able to spot the signs of ocular surface disease. There are a few common issues you may notice. For example, you may notice highly elevated osmolarity in the patient’s ocular fluid. If the ionic concentration is off, this is something you need to address before you take measurements and start the procedure.

You may also notice your regular astigmatism related to the patient’s cornea. If you are spotting epithelial abnormalities, this is something you need to address as well. You should take this into account when you get the patient ready for the surgical procedure. 

Furthermore, you might notice significant corneal staining. If this is a problem, you should have this addressed prior to the eye procedure. It is important for ensuring positive surgical outcomes.

If you invest in the latest tools and best practices in the industry, you can place your patients in the best position possible to succeed.

Optimize the Ocular Surface Prior to Cataract Surgery

Ultimately, if you have someone who is getting ready for cataract surgery, you need to optimize the ocular surface. In addition to performing a comprehensive history and physical, you should also take a closer look at the ocular surface. Remember that there are advanced materials that can help you optimize the ocular surface, improving your patient outcomes. Give your patients the ability to see clearly again. 

Image by Sofie Zbořilová from Pixabay 

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